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Social Media... New Form Of Protest?

Social Media... New Form Of Protest?

Many of you have been venting about the George Zimmerman verdict on social media sites like Twitter and Facebook. But, the Zimmerman verdict isn’t the only thing that has you taking your frustrations out online.

Not by a long shot.

For instance, Houstonian Alan Wakim recently proposed to his girlfriend at the Southern Breeze Equestrian Center. The pictures went viral and people hammered him on Twitter, calling him an attention hog among other things. Wakim told KTRH he was thrown for a loop by the reaction.

“Some of them upset me because they were personal,” Wakim stated. People want to vent. The average citizen doesn’t get a chance to make their voices known like celebrities.”

Houston social media strategist Crystal Washington told KTRH she's not surprised at the reaction.

“People are angry, but they take it to another level because social media has replaced the diary,” Washington explained. “People are more likely to report negative experiences. We see the same thing with restaurant service. People are more likely to take the time to go online and report something bad that happened.”

Washington says sometimes people can find themselves in hot water for what they Tweet.

“There was a young man that Tweeted, ‘Zimmerman goes free. I’m going to go to my school and shoot up everyone and get off like Zimmerman.’ As a result, he was arrested,” Washington explained.

Washington says the lesson here is that you shouldn’t Tweet anything you wouldn’t want your grandmother to see.

So, with all of this negativity on line, has social media become the new protest? Washington says no.

“Protests involve action. You can use social media to organize, but you can’t use it to protest. You can just get information out there,” Washington said.

 

 

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