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Porn At Work Causing IT Issues

Porn At Work Causing IT Issues

Employees surfing porn on work computers has become an issue for many companies, but now there is a study showing just how big the problem is.  A new survey of IT professionals by the company Threat Track reveals 40% have had to remove malware from a company computer because someone had visited a pornographic website.  Perhaps more surprising was who the biggest culprits are for work porn surfing: upper level company executives. 

"It might be that the bosses' computers are a little more 'unlocked'," says Richard Gerlovich, IT manager for Clear Channel Houston.  "A lot of companies block porn sites from being able to be viewed by (lower level) employees."  Regardless of where it originates, dealing with these avoidable malware infections takes up a majority of most IT pros' work time, according to the survey.

Gerlovich explains that problems with cyber security go beyond porn websites.  "Online shopping, I would say, is just as bad as porn sites," he tells KTRH.  "Porn sites may be more embarrassing, but the coupon sites ask you to load software that is basically malware." 

That malware then infects company computers and oftentimes the company's entire network. "That (malware) is constantly running in the background slowing your computer down, it also pings the Internet looking for content to serve you," says Gerlovich.  He recommends all employees be wary of where they click and what they install on work computers.  "Try not to install players if you're going to view video content of any type online, porn or not."

Besides porn and coupon sites, the other most common issue encountered by IT pros in the survey was employees clicking on a malicious link in an e-mail.  Other problems were employees letting a family member use a company device, and executives installing malicious mobile apps on company devices.  The bottom line, according to Gerlovich and other IT pros, is that it is best to check with your company's tech staff before clicking on any suspicious links or installing any programs or apps on a company device.  Gerlovich also recommends products like Malwarebytes and Microsoft Essentials to scan your computer and prevent infections.

 

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